Monthly Archives: February 2017

“I’m not one of them, but I’m not one of you.”

Originally posted on A Postcolonial Something:
I’ve been looking forward to writing this post all week—but I’m sitting here hesitating, and wondering where to begin; typing, then backspacing, then typing again. I had an extremely strong reaction to page 205 of “Nervous Conditions” this past week. That page has honestly been haunting me since Wednesday.…

In the face of hatred, students march peacefully

KU hosts Solidarity March By Michaela Yurchak Students, faculty and Kutztown residents joined together on Feb. 16 to march in response to hate propaganda on campus and recent events that have come up across the nation. Kutztown Resists, a campus group, put the march into motion. According to the Kutztown Resists Facebook page, they identify […] […]

Episode Five of Inside 254 is ready for you!

Remember how Trump says he is the “least racist” person. Listen and consider his comment as you think about how we speak about oppression. Here are some links to help you dive into Episode Five: What is structural oppression? Blacks Lives Matter John Oliver Samantha Bee Donald Trump’s twitter feed (open if you dare!) Best […] […]

“Almost the same, but not white.”

Originally posted on A Postcolonial Something:
In sitting here and attempting to formulate my own opinions about “Nervous Conditions” by Tsitsi Dangarembga, I came to the conclusion that I am not going to allow Homi Bhaba’s theories on mimicry and ambivalence to take away from my enjoyment of Dangarembga’s novel. But I am also aware…

I Was There In The Room: Vagina Monologues, 2017

Loved that Ev and Matt joined the audience last night!  Here’s a video Matt took of my performance.   Congrats to the amazing cast!

Why we Should all be Feminists- Chimamanda Adichie

Originally posted on Teaching Acceptance:
Why we Should all be Feminists-Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie February 8, 2017 Over the weekend, as I sat an listened to an unnamed family member criticize the women’s march and the disgusting actions of the women involved, I announced to my extended family for the first time that I am a…

Nationalism: A Fiction

Originally posted on PostColonial Minds:
What kind of nation are we? It is clear that there are two kinds of nation state–the one we practice and the one we believe in (or an “ideal”). Benedict Anderson makes it apparent that nationalism, as we experience it, is almost a form of group delusion. Something we know…

Postcolonial Literature in the Modern World

Thoughtful Discussions and Insights Regarding Postcolonial Literature, Diverse Cultures, and the Broad Spectrum of the Human Condition

Esperando por una Revolución

Una Historia de Amor


Comp is Awesome

Where everyone loves comp

Women & Pregnancy

Exploring the experiences women have during pregnancy

DemiConsensual: Gender, Sexuality, and Feminism in the Modern World

Making sense of all things gender, sexuality, identity, and feminist in our current culture.

The Female Reflection

A blog of opinon based responses to female literature & film

Standardized Testing

How testing harms children

Lay's Thoughts

Feminist Theory

TEACHING FEMINISM

A blog about how to navigate feminism

Reflections for Educators

A website for using the Reflections series in the classroom

Small Town Feminist

Thoughts and comments from a college feminist living in a small town.

2016 Presidential Election: Women's and Gender Issues

"Gender equality is more than a goal in itself. It is a precondition for meeting the challenge of reducing poverty, promoting sustainable development and building good governance." — Kofi Annan

Rise Up Doylestown!

We stand together in solidarity with our partners and children for the protection of our rights, our safety, our health, and our families - recognizing that our vibrant and diverse communities are the strength of our country.

KU Postcolonial Theory and Texts

“Create dangerously, for people who read dangerously. ... Writing, knowing in part that no matter how trivial your words may seem, someday, somewhere, someone may risk his or her life to read them.” Edwidge Danticat